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pse of Mitsubishi's

    • 784 posts
    May 10, 2019 8:38 AM CEST

    by Mahmoud Fouly

     

    MATROUH Cool Base Daniel Murphy Jersey , Egypt, March 21 (Xinhua) -- Over the past few months, Egyptian expatriates crossed Salloum Land Port in Egypt's Matrouh province to return home after bitter suffering in the turmoil-stricken Liyba.

     

    A lot of them narrated long stories about the challenges and threats they faced on their way home, particularly following the airstrike the Egyptian forces launched in February at targets of extremists affiliated with the Islamic State (IS) militant group after the latter released a video showing the beheading of 21 Egyptian Copts in Libya.

     

    "My brother has come empty-handed from Libya after he was stopped before reaching the Libyan border town of Musaed and all his luggage and money were taken," said Abdel-Rahman, talking about his 40-year-old brother Attiya who was too devastated to talk to the media.

     

    Abbdel-Rahman told Xinhua that his brother worked at a pharmacy in Benghazi, expressing grief about his brother's loss of his one-year savings in Libya but at the same time he was pleased that Attiya made it home sound and safe despite the materialistic loss.

     

    On their own words, many Egyptian expatriates in Libya were subjected to verbal and physical assaults by zealous and extremist Libyans who considered airstrikes in Libya transgression over the country's sovereignty, although the Libyan army said they were done through coordination between the Egyptian and the Libyan sides.

     

    "After the airstrikes, some Libyans started to bother Egyptian sellers and buyers at marketplaces to the point that they would even call then names," said 30-year-old Eshaibi, who worked in the construction field near Benghazi.

     

    Eshaibi, who is originally from Matrouh province, some 550 km northwest of the capital Cairo, told Xinhua that the people of Matrouh, particularly those from Salloum, suffer the least in Libya as they come from tribes similar to those in Libya and they could speak the Libyan Arabic dialect fluently.

     

    The picture is not quite dim for Egyptian expatriates in Libya. Ali for example, a young Egyptian man in his 20s, told Xinhua in a phone interview that he decided to continue his construction work at the Libyan border town of Musaed, reassuring that the town is completely safe for Egyptians due to its closeness to the borders.

     

    "It is just about 12 kms away from Egypt, so we feel completely safe and there are no problems for us working here," Ali said, noting that his work is going well and that he transfers money normally to his family back home.

     

    The returnees said the Egyptian authorities provided them with utmost help and support until they returned to their home towns, particularly those who lacked money and provision on their arduous journey.

     

    "In fact, the Egyptian authorities did a great job to help us before and after arriving at Salloum port; they really paid a great interest and there was no negligence on their part at all," a returnee who preferred not to be identified told Xinhua at the border land port.

     

    Some 45,000 Egyptian expatriates have returned from Libya so far, about 75 percent of whom came through Salloum border crossing while the rest returned via air flights from Tunis to Cairo.

     

    "There's no 'evacuation' imposed by the government on Egyptian expatriates in Libya, but we provide help and support for those who voluntarily decide to come back," Egyptian Foreign Ministry's spokesman Badr Abdel-Atty told Xinhua on Saturday.

     

    Abdel-Atty also met on Saturday with family members of 26 missing Egyptians in Libya who attempted to illegally infiltrate from there to Italy, reassuring them that the foreign ministry does its best and coordinates with the concerned diplomats to find them.

     

    Mitsubishi Motors shares nosedived again Thursday as panic selling wiped about $2.5 billion off the automaker's market value in response to its shock admission that it cheated on fuel-efficiency tests.

     

    The embarrassing revelation is the latest in a string of recent scandals to hit Japanese firms, while German giant Volkswagen struggles to restore its badly dented reputation after a massive emissions scandal.

     

    Japanese transport ministry officials raided a company research and development centre Thursday following the admission, as the government slammed the maker of Outlander sport utility vehicles and Lancer cars.

     

    The embattled stock plunged to 583 yen ($5.31) in Tokyo, down 20 percent, after diving 15 percent on Wednesday when news of the fuel-cheating first broke.

     

    The scandal has also raised questions about Mitsubishi's future as it faces the prospect of huge lawsuits and fines.

     

    "This has critically damaged consumers' trust and it won't be tolerated," top government spokesman Yoshihide Suga said Thursday. "It's an extremely serious issue."

     

    Mitsubishi admitted Wednesday that unnamed employees rigged tests to make some of its cars seem more fuel-efficient than they were in reality.

     

    The company said it would halt production and sales of the affected vehicle models -- mini-cars sold in Japan including some made for rival Nissan -- and warned that the number of cars involved in the scandal would likely rise.

     

    Mitsubishi's top executive conceded Wednesday that the crisis would take a bite out of its bottom line, as the firm widens an internal probe to cars sold overseas.

     

    "This is not a simple problem and we need time" to assess the impact, president Tetsuro Aikawa told a news briefing.

     

    "But I'm sure there will be an impact. The damage will be big."

     

    Company loyalty

     

    The collapse of Mitsubishi's stock on Wednesday was its biggest one-day plunge since 2004.

     

    At that time, Mitsubishi was struggling to launch a turnaround as it teetered on the edge of bankruptcy, hit by a lack of cash and a series of huge recalls linked to deadly defects.

     

    Bailouts by the Mitsubishi group companies saved the automaker, which had covered up defects . Cheap Hats   Wholesale Jerseys China Free Shipping   Cheap Sports Jerseys Free Shipping   Cheap Shirts   Cheap NCAA Jerseys   Cheap Soccer Jerseys   Cheap NHL Hoddies   Cheap NFL Hoddies   Cheap Baseball Hoddies   Cheap Hats China